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University Studies Taxpayers Pay For That Grasp The Obvious

September 25, 2010

WASHINGTON — Bouncing from home to home exacts a significant toll on a child’s ability to learn.Preliminary data from a 10-year study released Thursday, looking at how California foster kids stack up against their at-risk peers, suggests that academic challenges posed by poverty, disability and language barriers are compounded when those children also have to shuffle from school to school because they have no permanent family.

WOW! I DON’T KNOW HOW THE BRAIN TRUSTS COME UP WITH THESE RESEARCH IDEAS.  I’M SO GLAD MY MONEY PAID FOR THIS ONE.  WHO KNOWS WHEN THE NON-IVORY LEAGUE CROWD WOULD HAVE FIGURED THIS OUT.

 The study, conducted by researchers at the University of California at Berkeley, shows that foster children consistently scored lower in state English and math tests, even when factors such as income, race and learning disabilities were taken into account. The findings confirm earlier studies analyzing foster children in the Midwest and Washington state but the final California report, due out later this year, will be the first to examine how different circumstances within the foster care network affect student learning, researchers said.

 The data was released at a Capitol Hill news conference by the Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute and Fostering Media Connections, which are hoping to spotlight the issue in Congress. Legislation, sponsored by Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., would direct child-welfare agencies to collaborate with local school districts to ensure that foster children remain in their current schools after they move to new school districts if it’s in their best interest.

TRANSLATION: THIS IS ALL ABOUT FEDERAL GRANT FUNDS.

PROBLEM: NO MONEY

SOLUTION: DO A STUDY.   GO TO THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AND SAY, HEY WE HAVE A STUDY THAT SAYS A CHILD THAT MOVES AROUND A LOT WITH NO PERMANENT HOME SCORES LOWER ON TESTS IN SCHOOLS.  FEDERAL GOVERNMENT GOES, OH, WE WOULD HAVE NEVER GUESSED THAT.  HOW MUCH MONEYDO YOU NEED TO RESEARCH A SOLUTION?

 There are some 400,000 children in foster care at any one time in the United States. The average time a child spends in the foster care system is about 27 months, advocates say.

 No one needs to promote the importance of stability to Christina Miranda, a foster child from the Reading, Pa., area who shuttled among 10 different schools between the ages of 5 and 18. At 13, Christina thought she had finally found a permanent school — until she was told one afternoon that she had three hours to leave because she was being sent to another family in another community.

 “I remember moving to that new foster home,” she said during the news conference. “I had this new room. I’m in a new town. I’m with a new foster care agency. New school. New teachers. New friends. That can be very traumatizing for a child, but to have to go through that all the times that I did, it’s unbelievable.”

 Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., who has been a foster parent to 23 children — all teenage girls — said she’s not surprised how important a permanent home is for a student who may be struggling with the complexities of algebra or the intricacies of grammar.

 “The one thing we learned in foster care is that stability is very important in a child’s life,” she said. “Children need a sense of place.”

IT’S A GOOD THING WE HAVE POST GRADUATE Ph.Ds TO FIGURE THIS STUFF OUT FOR US.

 

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